UBC Archaeology Day 2015: Saving Endangered Cultural Heritage for Our Common Future

UBC Archaeology Day 2015: Saving Endangered Cultural Heritage for Our Common Future

UBC Archaeology Day 2015 aims at raising public awareness of the ever increasing destruction of cultural heritage and archaeological resources in many parts of the world, and addressing the urgency and importance of protecting the vanishing heritage for our common future.

In this unprecedented era of globalization and urbanization, one of the most pressing global problems today is the protection and conservation of historical resources and cultural heritage. Untold numbers of archaeological sites and all forms of historic heritage around the world are being ruthlessly obliterated or severely damaged in the midst of armed conflicts and wars, as well as in the name of development. Widespread looting of archaeological sites has been accelerating worldwide, a phenomenon that can be directly related to the commercial marketing of illegally excavated artifacts by auction houses and galleries. Moreover, the indigenous presence in many places across the world is being obliterated deliberately at an unprecedented scale and pace. The knowledge obtained through proper archaeological excavation is irreplaceable, cultural heritage is nonrenewable, and every indigenous culture must be cherished as an essential part of modern humanity. Once destroyed they are lost forever.

UBC Archaeology Day 2015 is open to anyone with an interest in, and concern for, the protection of our endangered cultural heritage, archaeological resources, and indigenous culture here in British Columbia as well as across the world.

This event is organized by the Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, and Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia.

 

(Light breakfast and lunch provided)

Inquiries about the event should be directed to Dr. Zhichun Jing at jingzh@mail.ubc.ca or 604-822-4937

 

Keynote Speech (Charles Lecture)

A Momentary Erasure of Millennia: The Cultural Heritage Crises in Syria and Northern Iraq

Michael Danti (Department of Archaeology, Boston University

 

Presentations and Speakers:

 

Two Steps Forward, One Step Back: The Slow Dance of Indigenous Heritage Protection

George Nicholas (Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University)

 

Evaluation and Conservation Plan for Hammam in Akko, Israel

Courtney Innes (Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia)

 

In a Hard Place: Some Observations on Heritage Management in British Columbia

Andrew Mason (Golder Associates Ltd.)

 

Cultural Heritage in Ruins: The Failure of Archaeological Practice in Syria

Lisa Cooper (Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia)

Cultural Heritage in Tunisia, Before and After the Revolution: The Challenges and Opportunities of a Pluralistic Past

Megan Daniels (Department of Classics, Stanford University)

 

Nothing Could Be Further From the Truth: Grace Islet, a Coast Salish Cemetery (Shmukw’elu) and Colonial Conflict

Christopher Arnett and Peter Merchant (Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia)

Reflections of Dilmun and Tylos: Threats to Cultural Heritage in Bahrain

Lynn Welton, Ryan Johnson, and Courtney Innes (Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia)

 

Righting the Past

Larissa Grant1, Terry Point1, Wayne Point1, Sue Rowley2, Leona Sparrow1, Jordan Wilson1, 2 and Jason Woolman1, 2

1(Musqueam First Nation)

2(Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia)

 

Friends of Cedar Mesa: Protecting Landscapes in the US Southwest

R.G. Matson (Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia)

 

Whose Marbles?  Lord Elgin and the sculpture of the Parthenon

Hector Williams (Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia)

State Sanctioned Destruction of Indigenous Material Heritage on BC’s North Coast

Charles Menzies (Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia)

 

UNESCO World Heritage HEADS Programme: Recognition and Conservation of Early Sites in the Americas

Suzanne Villeneuve (Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto)

 

Statement on the Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Iraq and SyriaStatement on the Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Iraq and Syria

 

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