Graduate Courses

This is a comprehensive listing of all graduate-level courses in the department, but not all courses will be offered every year.

Please note that the Student Services Centre (SSC) provides the most up-to-date information regarding current course offerings.

ANTH 500 (6): History of Anthropological Thought
Various approaches to anthropology, from classical to contemporary. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 501 (2-6) d: Social Structure and Kinship
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 502 (2-18) d: Advanced Ethnography of a Special Area
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 505 (2-6) d: Religion and Society
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 506 (3/6) d: Current Research in Anthropology
The relationship between current theoretical issues and research methods. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 510 (3-6) c: Comparative and Developmental Studies in Archaeology
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 512 (2-6) d: Language and Culture
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 513 (3-6) d: Advanced Studies in Feminist Anthropology
Feminist approaches to ethnography, theory, methodology; current issues in feminist anthropology; gender relations; feminist anthropology and postmodernism. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 515 (2-6) d: Cultural Evolution and Cultural Ecology
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 516 (3): Qualitative Methods in Anthropology
A discussion of selected methods used to observe, describe, and interpret cultural phenomena and social organization, including participant observation, interviewing, ethnographic semantics, life histories, componential analysis, and photography. Attention will also be given to ethics in anthropological research and writing and to such analytic matters as the nature of description, conceptualization, generalization, and content analysis. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 517 (3): Archaeological Methods
A discussion of selected basic data-gathering methods in their relation to the development of ideas about the archaeological record. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 518 (3/6) d: Museum Methods
Analytical approaches to the study of museums and collections. Methods of field collecting, collections research, laboratory procedures, visitor studies, social organization of museum and related cultural industries, exhibit and program evaluation techniques and the ethics of museum research and practice. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 519 (3/6) d: Seminar in Medical Anthropology
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 520 (2-6) c: Advanced Prehistory of a Special Area
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 527 (3): Advanced Archaeological Methods
An intensive review of analytical approaches to the study of archaeological data and their applications. Includes research design; sampling strategies; analytical lab procedures; classification and typology; and multivariate analysis and other statistical procedures. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

Prerequisite: ANTH 517.

ANTH 528 (3): Advanced Quantitative Methods
Introduction to the anthropological application of a variety of quantitative techniques: sampling designs, analysis of variance and regression, multi-way contingency tables, multivariate analysis. A series of lectures will outline the logic and exhibit applications that have been made. Students will then generate their own application and presentation. Access to data files specific to the substantive field of cultural anthropology, archaeology, physical anthropology is provided. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

Prerequisite: ANTH 418.

ANTH 530 (2-6) d: Social Change
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 532 (2-6) d: Field Methods
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 534 (2-6) d: Special Advanced Courses
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 540A (2-6) d: Anthropology of Colonialism

ANTH 540B (2-6) d Anthropology of Science and Technology
Anthropologies of science and technology approach science as both a culture and practice, examining how facts are made, how they circulate, and how they come to matter for diverse publics. Such approaches to knowledge production, institutional contexts, and the emergence of new forms of expertise have become increasingly important as complex global problems like climate change present newly configured challenges for both sciences and societies.  This course will closely examine and actively discuss ethnographic studies of field sites that range from nuclear weapons laboratories and surgical operating theatres to tech start-ups, activist communities, and responses to recent disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and Fukushima.  Students are encouraged to research and reflect on the role of science and technology in politics, policy, social movements, and as represented in media. Cross-listed with ANTH495A 001

ANTH 540C (2-6) d: Mobilities and Immobilities

ANTH 540D (2-6) d: Anthropology and Human Rights
Human rights have risen to prominence as the most globally significant language of political resistance of our times, having filled the ideological gap left by the decline of communism, socialism and the welfare state.  This seminar will consider human rights as a specifically anthropological topic of study and engagement.  Topics will include the conceptual background and origins of human rights in the 20thcentury, the tension between universalism and relativism in the ongoing definition of human rights, the rights of aboriginal peoples, human rights and gender, and the development of cultural rights.  We will also address the challenges of implementing and protecting human rights in the midst of state violence, genocide and other forms of repression, and discuss the possibilities of activism and scholarly engagement in the area of human rights. Cross listed with ANTH495B 002

ANTH 541 (3/6) d Advanced Seminar in Critical Museum Anthropology
What are some of the individual and social motivations, the political, economic and cultural effects, and the moral and ethical implications of collecting, creating and ordering assemblages and destroying monuments and art works that triangulate material and intellectual cultures and social relationships? This course introduces this core theme through examining historical and contemporary cross-cultural examples and situating questions of collecting, competing agencies, and cultural obliteration within global politics. Cross listed with ANTH495C 200

ANTH 545 (2-6) d: Graduate Research Seminar
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 548 (0): Major Essay

ANTH 549 (6/12) c: Master’s Thesis
This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

ANTH 551 (3/6) d: Cultural Studies in Communication and Interpretation
History, theories, principles and techniques of communication and interpretation of cultural materials. Topics include examination of how various media (script, objects, film, video) are used to interpret histories, society, and culture in museums, art galleries, historic sites and related areas; and how communication programs are planned, implemented and assessed. This course is not eligible for Credit/D/Fail grading.

Prerequisite: ANTH 431. Permission of the instructor is also acceptable.

ANTH 649 (0): Doctoral Dissertation