2019 – 2020 Colloquium

When Forest Run Amok. Violence and its Afterlives in Indigenous and Afro-Colombian Territories

Thursday September 26, 2019

ANSO 134

11:30 - 1:30 pm

Event Poster: PDF

Dr. Daniel Ruiz-Serna

 Abstract:

In this presentation Dr. Daniel Ruiz-Serna will explore a form of ecological violence that accounts not only for environmental degradation but that encompasses worldly relations between sentient beings. He argues that warfare is an experience extending beyond people and that it provokes damage to the relational worlds of human and other-than-human beings.

About the speaker:

Dr. Daniel Ruiz-Serna is a postdoctoral fellow in the department of anthropology at UBC and in the Center for Oral History and Digital Storytelling at Concordia University.

Early monumental architecture and public ritual at La Blanca, Guatemala

Thursday October 10, 2019

ANSO 134

11:30 - 1:30 pm

Event Poster: PDF

Dr. Michael Love

 Abstract:

The temple pyramid is perhaps the quintessential form of public architecture in ancient Mesoamerica, but most of what we know about this building type is define by examples from the Classic and PostClassic periods.  The first pyramids, however, were built in the Middle Preclassic period and were made of earth, not stone. Little is known of those earliest structures, and their dating is uncertain. La Blanca, Guatemala was one of Mesoamerica’s largest Middle Preclassic sites and one of the first to build the quintessential Mesoamerican architectural form, the temple pyramid.  Mound 1 at the site, built ca. 1000 BCE, originally stood 25 m in height before being nearly razed in 1972.  Excavations since 2003 have had the goals of defining the complete construction sequence of Mound 1 as well as investigating its immediate vicinity for evidence of public ritual.  Excavations have found evidence of ritual structure associated with Mound 1 on both north and south sides.  On the north side of Mound 1 a series of floors represent the remains of an earlier building, probably a low platform, over which Mound 1 was constructed.  Remains of shell, bone, and pottery are evidence of rituals that either terminated the earlier structure or served to dedicate the site prior to the construction of the monumental pyramid.  The excavation of anomalies found in GPR survey hint that the base of Mound 1 may have taken the form of a quatrefoil, which in ancient Mesoamerica symbolized a portal to the underworld.  Mound 1 thus seems linked to Monument 3, an earthen quatrefoil shaped sculpture found in 2004.

About the speaker:

Dr. Michael Love is a Professor of Anthropology at California State University, Northridge.  His research interests focus on Mesoamerica, early social complexity, ceramic analysis, and household archaeology.   Most recently, he has conducted research on early urbanism, political cycling and state formation on the Pacific coast of Guatemala, working at the sites of La Blanca and El Ujuxte through the examination of changes in household economy and ritual.

A Career Dedicated to Researching Human/Plant World Making: The UBC Roots

ANSO 134

11:30 am-1:00 pm

Event Poster: PDF

Laura Rival

 Abstract:

Prof. Rival will outline through a range of ethnographical examples derived from her work with the Huaorani (Ecuador) and the Makushi (Guyana) the approach to life and botanical ontologies that she is currently developing with her research students. She will show how the training she received in the department in the early 1980s profoundly influenced my anthropological thinking and helped her shape the Human/Plant World Making Research Programme.

About the speaker:

Laura Rival is an Associate Professor at Oxford University, where she teaches various courses relating to the Anthropology of Nature, Society, and Development. Her research interests include Anthropology and interdisciplinarity; Amerindian conceptualizations of nature and society; historical and political ecology; development, conservation and environmental policies in Latin America; sustainability in the Anthropocene; indigenous peoples and theories of human development. She has written several books and numerous papers on these topics. She is currently working on a book exploring the world making practices of Latin American and European agroecologists.

November 19, 2019 'Ground Down by Growth: Tribe, Caste, Class and Inequality in 21st Century India

Tuesday November 19, 2019

5:00-6:30 pm

Room 120   |  C. K. Choi Building, 1855 West Mall

Event Poster: PDF

Dr. Alpa Shah

 Abstract:

Why has India’s astonishing economic growth not reached the people at the bottom of its social and economic hierarchy? Travelling the length and breadth of the subcontinent, this book shows how India’s ‘untouchables' and ‘tribals' fit into the global economy.

India’s Dalit and Adivasi communities make up a staggering one in twenty-five people across the globe and yet they remain amongst the most oppressed. Conceived in dialogue with economists, the impact of global capitalism on their lives. It shows how capitalism entrenches, rather than erases, social difference and has transformed traditional forms of identity-based discrimination into new mechanisms of exploitation and oppression.

Through studies of the working poor, migrant labour and the conjugated oppression of caste, tribe, region, gender and class relations, the social inequalities generated by capitalism are exposed.

About the speaker:

Alpa Shah was raised in Nairobi, read Geography at Cambridge and completed her PhD in Anthropology at the London School of Economics, where she now teaches as Associate Professor. Her most recent book Nightmarch was shortlisted for the 2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing and New India Foundation Book Prize and on several 2018 Best Books list of the Hindu newspaper.

She has reported for BBC Radio 4 and the World Service and co-curated the photo exhibition, Behind the Indian Boom.

Reverse Ethnography: Strategies for Recovering from Anthropological Search and Rescue

Thursday November 28, 2019

ANSO 134

5:00-6:30 pm

Event Poster: PDF

Dr. Margaret M. Bruchac

 Abstract:

Seemingly routine practices of collection and display have created artificial separations among Indigenous peoples, objects, and stories; restorative decolonizing research is, therefore, crucial in any efforts toward recovery and reconciliation.

About the speaker:

Dr. Margaret M. Bruchac, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Coordinator of Native American and Indigenous Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, is the director of "The Wampum Trail" research project and author of "Savage Kin: Indigenous Informants and American Anthropologists" (University of Arizona Press 2018).

Reluctant Exiles to Voluntary Diaspora: Post 1997 Migrations from Hong Kong

Tuesday December 3, 2019

ANSO 134

2:00-3:00 pm

Event Poster: PDF

Dr. Chan Yuk Wah

 Abstract:

As a politically diverse and economically active region, Asia has become a central concern for world politics and global economic development since the 1990s. Asia also continues to take the lead in generating international migrations. Many Asians are active movers and are making multiple times of migration during one’s life time. In the 1980s and 1990s, out of fear of Hong Kong’s pending return to China, a large number of middle class families immigrated to western countries such as the USA, Canada and Australia, and were described as “reluctant exiles.” Migrations from Hong Kong have picked up momentum again since the 2010s due to Hong Kong’s rapidly changing social and political environment. Rather than describing them as reluctant migrants, this paper will examine how Hong Kong migrants have gradually formed a voluntary and fluid diaspora around the world. It attempts to use Hong Kong as a typical case of migration studies to look into the pattern of outmigration, return migration, and double reverse migration.

About the speaker:

Yuk Wah Chan is Associate Professor of the Department of Asian and International Studies at City University of Hong Kong. She is an editor of the Routledge Series on Asian Migration and has published widely on Asian migration, Asian borderlands, food and identity.