Lindsey Paskulin

launchAdapt UBC

About

BS Archaeology, University of Aberdeen (UK) 2018

MS Bioarchaeology, University of York (UK) 2019

UBC Supervisor: Camilla Speller


Research

Research key words: Archaeology, biomolecular archaeology, past foodways, ancient protein analysis, cuisine

Research interests:

Lindsey employs methods of ancient protein analysis to build better understandings of past foodways. Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS) can provide taxonomic information for archaeological faunal material that is unable to be identified using traditional morphology-based methods. Through the analysis of bone fragments, bone tools, and other material, Lindsey seeks to broaden the use of this technique within Canada as a complement to zooarchaeology. Ancient proteomics, or palaeoproteomics, is a powerful tool for characterising all proteins within a sample. Lindsey is interested in applying proteomics to vessel interiors and vessel residues to reconstruct elements of food processing, preparation, and consumption in the past. Her PhD is primarily concerned with how these methods can elucidate questions of subsistence, foodways, and cuisine in past societies. Lindsey works in the university’s dedicated ancient DNA and protein (ADaPT) laboratory under the supervision of Dr. Camilla Speller.


Lindsey Paskulin

launchAdapt UBC

About

BS Archaeology, University of Aberdeen (UK) 2018

MS Bioarchaeology, University of York (UK) 2019

UBC Supervisor: Camilla Speller


Research

Research key words: Archaeology, biomolecular archaeology, past foodways, ancient protein analysis, cuisine

Research interests:

Lindsey employs methods of ancient protein analysis to build better understandings of past foodways. Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS) can provide taxonomic information for archaeological faunal material that is unable to be identified using traditional morphology-based methods. Through the analysis of bone fragments, bone tools, and other material, Lindsey seeks to broaden the use of this technique within Canada as a complement to zooarchaeology. Ancient proteomics, or palaeoproteomics, is a powerful tool for characterising all proteins within a sample. Lindsey is interested in applying proteomics to vessel interiors and vessel residues to reconstruct elements of food processing, preparation, and consumption in the past. Her PhD is primarily concerned with how these methods can elucidate questions of subsistence, foodways, and cuisine in past societies. Lindsey works in the university’s dedicated ancient DNA and protein (ADaPT) laboratory under the supervision of Dr. Camilla Speller.


Lindsey Paskulin

launchAdapt UBC
About keyboard_arrow_down

BS Archaeology, University of Aberdeen (UK) 2018

MS Bioarchaeology, University of York (UK) 2019

UBC Supervisor: Camilla Speller

Research keyboard_arrow_down

Research key words: Archaeology, biomolecular archaeology, past foodways, ancient protein analysis, cuisine

Research interests:

Lindsey employs methods of ancient protein analysis to build better understandings of past foodways. Zooarchaeology by Mass Spectrometry (ZooMS) can provide taxonomic information for archaeological faunal material that is unable to be identified using traditional morphology-based methods. Through the analysis of bone fragments, bone tools, and other material, Lindsey seeks to broaden the use of this technique within Canada as a complement to zooarchaeology. Ancient proteomics, or palaeoproteomics, is a powerful tool for characterising all proteins within a sample. Lindsey is interested in applying proteomics to vessel interiors and vessel residues to reconstruct elements of food processing, preparation, and consumption in the past. Her PhD is primarily concerned with how these methods can elucidate questions of subsistence, foodways, and cuisine in past societies. Lindsey works in the university’s dedicated ancient DNA and protein (ADaPT) laboratory under the supervision of Dr. Camilla Speller.