About

I am a PhD student in anthropology working under the supervision of Dr. Mark Turin. My research explores the distribution of languages, resettlement patterns, and complex language practices of marginalized language communities in New York City, the intersection of technology and development in Nepal, and the ongoing socioecological impacts of wildfires. I come to UBC with a professional background in geographic information systems (GIS), wetland delineation and classification, hydrography, and a strong commitment to service, particularly through humanitarian GIS and citizen mapping initiatives. I received my MSc in Geography in 2009, focusing on the relationship between landscape and language among Kaike speakers in Dolpa, Nepal, using a participatory mapping approach to illustrate gendered and children’s worldviews.  Other research projects include: the role of street theater in social change in Nepal; the socio-historical co-evolution of the supernatural and religion in southern Italy; the efficacy of a women’s empowerment program for an international NGO in Nepal; and the association between food and family relationships across three generations of one Italian-American family.


Research

Research Key Words: Language, mobility, identity, borders, space and place, urban anthropology, mapping, GIS, wildfires, socioecological resilience, disaster, climate change, infrastructures, technologies

Research Summary:

I am currently involved in four ongoing research projects.

Language Mapping
As part of a collaborative team represented by university and community researchers from UBC, Dartmouth, NYC, and the Endangered Language Alliance, we are exploring the complexities of mapping urban linguistic diversity in NYC and the impact of COVID-19 on marginalized language communities. Please see the Languages of New York City interactive map of linguistic diversity.

Wildfire Ethnography
Using the 2020 Cameron Peak Fire in Colorado as a focal point, this research aims to unsettle the chronologies of disaster to understand periods of disruption and loss in the context of the socioecological processes that both precede and follow wildfires and continue to impact both people and the environment long after the fire has been extinguished.

Civic Technologies in Nepal
I am researching civic technologies in Nepal in relation to development and other forms of technological infrastructure. The pandemic has also opened up additional research paths in this context. During the height of Nepal’s pandemic experience with the Delta variant, multiple volunteer-led initiatives emerged using technology to connect patients with critical oxygen supply, for example, illustrating the development and use of civil technologies in real time to address gaps in the government response.

Ecologies of Harm: Mapping Contexts of Vulnerability in the Time of COVID-19
Along with Principal Investigator Dr. Leslie Robertson and colleague Stephen Chignell, we have created a collaborative spatial archive to document locally defined conditions of vulnerability in order to generate opportunities for knowledge-sharing, dialogues, and solutions-based engagements. Read more about the project, view the spatial archive, and find out how to contribute at Ecologies of Harm.

Concurrent research interests include climate change and disaster vulnerability, language endangerment and maintenance, social-ecological resilience, mountain geographies, and anthropological, ecological, and humanitarian applications of GIS.


Publications

2021. Craig, Sienna, Nawang Gurung, Ross Perlin, Daniel Kaufman, Maya Daurio, Mark Turin. “Global Pandemic, Translocal Medicine: The COVID-19 Diaries of a Tibetan Physician in New York City.” Asian Medicine 16: 55-88.

2021. Craig, Sienna R., Nawang Tsering Gurung, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufmann, and Mark Turin. “Negotiating Invisibility at the Epicenter: Himalayan New Yorkers Confront Covid-19.” Items. June 10.

2021. Perlin, Ross, Nawang Gurung, Sienna Craig, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufman, and Mark Turin. “Who Will Care for the Care Worker? The COVID-19 Diaries of a Sherpa Nurse in New York City.” Issues Journal 4 (1).

2021. Craig, Sienna, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufman, Ross Perlin, and Mark Turin. “The Unequal Effects of COVID-19 on Multilingual Immigrant Communities.” The Globe and Mail, March 24.

2020. Gurung, Nawang, Ross Perlin, Mark Turin, Sienna R. Craig, Maya Daurio, and Daniel Kaufman. “Himalayan New Yorkers Tell Stories of COVID-19.” The Nepali Times, June 6..

2020. Daurio, Maya, Sienna R. Craig, Daniel Kaufman, Ross Perlin, and Mark Turin. “Subversive Maps: How Digital Language Mapping Can Support Biocultural Diversity—and Help Track a Pandemic.” Langscape Magazine Vol. 9, Summer/Winter 2020, “The Other Extinction Rebellion: Countering the Loss of Biocultural Diversity.”.

2020. Maya Daurio and Mark Turin. “‘Langscapes’ and Language Borders: Linguistic Boundary-Making in Northern South Asia.” Eurasia Border Review 10 (1), 21-42.

2020. Maya Daurio. “Review of Trans-Himalayan Traders Transformed: Return to Tarang.” Himalaya 39 (2).

2019. Maya Daurio. “The Significance of Place in Ethnolinguistic Vitality: Spatial Variations Across the Kaike-Speaking Diaspora Of Nepal.” In The Politics of Language Contact in the Himalaya, edited by Selma K. Sonntag and Mark Turin (Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers), pages 109-136.

2012. Maya Daurio. “The Fairy Language: Language Maintenance and Social-Ecological Resilience Among the Tarali of Tichurong, Nepal.” Himalaya 31 (1 & 2): 7-21.

2007. Maya Daurio. “Review of Beyond the Myth of Eco-Crisis: Local Responses to Pressure on Land in Nepal.” The Organization: A Practicing Manager’s Quarterly, July-September 10 (3).


Awards

Vanier Scholarship, 2021
Esri Canada GIS Scholarship (co-recipient with Stephen Chignell), 2021
President’s Academic Excellence Initiative PhD Award, UBC, 2021
Public Scholars Award, UBC, 2020
Four Year Doctoral Fellowship, UBC, 2019-2023


I am a PhD student in anthropology working under the supervision of Dr. Mark Turin. My research explores the distribution of languages, resettlement patterns, and complex language practices of marginalized language communities in New York City, the intersection of technology and development in Nepal, and the ongoing socioecological impacts of wildfires. I come to UBC with a professional background in geographic information systems (GIS), wetland delineation and classification, hydrography, and a strong commitment to service, particularly through humanitarian GIS and citizen mapping initiatives. I received my MSc in Geography in 2009, focusing on the relationship between landscape and language among Kaike speakers in Dolpa, Nepal, using a participatory mapping approach to illustrate gendered and children’s worldviews.  Other research projects include: the role of street theater in social change in Nepal; the socio-historical co-evolution of the supernatural and religion in southern Italy; the efficacy of a women’s empowerment program for an international NGO in Nepal; and the association between food and family relationships across three generations of one Italian-American family.

Research Key Words: Language, mobility, identity, borders, space and place, urban anthropology, mapping, GIS, wildfires, socioecological resilience, disaster, climate change, infrastructures, technologies

Research Summary:

I am currently involved in four ongoing research projects.

Language Mapping
As part of a collaborative team represented by university and community researchers from UBC, Dartmouth, NYC, and the Endangered Language Alliance, we are exploring the complexities of mapping urban linguistic diversity in NYC and the impact of COVID-19 on marginalized language communities. Please see the Languages of New York City interactive map of linguistic diversity.

Wildfire Ethnography
Using the 2020 Cameron Peak Fire in Colorado as a focal point, this research aims to unsettle the chronologies of disaster to understand periods of disruption and loss in the context of the socioecological processes that both precede and follow wildfires and continue to impact both people and the environment long after the fire has been extinguished.

Civic Technologies in Nepal
I am researching civic technologies in Nepal in relation to development and other forms of technological infrastructure. The pandemic has also opened up additional research paths in this context. During the height of Nepal's pandemic experience with the Delta variant, multiple volunteer-led initiatives emerged using technology to connect patients with critical oxygen supply, for example, illustrating the development and use of civil technologies in real time to address gaps in the government response.

Ecologies of Harm: Mapping Contexts of Vulnerability in the Time of COVID-19
Along with Principal Investigator Dr. Leslie Robertson and colleague Stephen Chignell, we have created a collaborative spatial archive to document locally defined conditions of vulnerability in order to generate opportunities for knowledge-sharing, dialogues, and solutions-based engagements. Read more about the project, view the spatial archive, and find out how to contribute at Ecologies of Harm.

Concurrent research interests include climate change and disaster vulnerability, language endangerment and maintenance, social-ecological resilience, mountain geographies, and anthropological, ecological, and humanitarian applications of GIS.

2021. Craig, Sienna, Nawang Gurung, Ross Perlin, Daniel Kaufman, Maya Daurio, Mark Turin. “Global Pandemic, Translocal Medicine: The COVID-19 Diaries of a Tibetan Physician in New York City.” Asian Medicine 16: 55-88.

2021. Craig, Sienna R., Nawang Tsering Gurung, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufmann, and Mark Turin. “Negotiating Invisibility at the Epicenter: Himalayan New Yorkers Confront Covid-19.” Items. June 10.

2021. Perlin, Ross, Nawang Gurung, Sienna Craig, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufman, and Mark Turin. “Who Will Care for the Care Worker? The COVID-19 Diaries of a Sherpa Nurse in New York City.” Issues Journal 4 (1).

2021. Craig, Sienna, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufman, Ross Perlin, and Mark Turin. “The Unequal Effects of COVID-19 on Multilingual Immigrant Communities.” The Globe and Mail, March 24.

2020. Gurung, Nawang, Ross Perlin, Mark Turin, Sienna R. Craig, Maya Daurio, and Daniel Kaufman. “Himalayan New Yorkers Tell Stories of COVID-19.” The Nepali Times, June 6..

2020. Daurio, Maya, Sienna R. Craig, Daniel Kaufman, Ross Perlin, and Mark Turin. “Subversive Maps: How Digital Language Mapping Can Support Biocultural Diversity—and Help Track a Pandemic.” Langscape Magazine Vol. 9, Summer/Winter 2020, "The Other Extinction Rebellion: Countering the Loss of Biocultural Diversity.".

2020. Maya Daurio and Mark Turin. “‘Langscapes’ and Language Borders: Linguistic Boundary-Making in Northern South Asia.” Eurasia Border Review 10 (1), 21-42.

2020. Maya Daurio. “Review of Trans-Himalayan Traders Transformed: Return to Tarang.” Himalaya 39 (2).

2019. Maya Daurio. “The Significance of Place in Ethnolinguistic Vitality: Spatial Variations Across the Kaike-Speaking Diaspora Of Nepal.” In The Politics of Language Contact in the Himalaya, edited by Selma K. Sonntag and Mark Turin (Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers), pages 109-136.

2012. Maya Daurio. “The Fairy Language: Language Maintenance and Social-Ecological Resilience Among the Tarali of Tichurong, Nepal.” Himalaya 31 (1 & 2): 7-21.

2007. Maya Daurio. “Review of Beyond the Myth of Eco-Crisis: Local Responses to Pressure on Land in Nepal.” The Organization: A Practicing Manager’s Quarterly, July-September 10 (3).

Vanier Scholarship, 2021
Esri Canada GIS Scholarship (co-recipient with Stephen Chignell), 2021
President's Academic Excellence Initiative PhD Award, UBC, 2021
Public Scholars Award, UBC, 2020
Four Year Doctoral Fellowship, UBC, 2019-2023

I am a PhD student in anthropology working under the supervision of Dr. Mark Turin. My research explores the distribution of languages, resettlement patterns, and complex language practices of marginalized language communities in New York City, the intersection of technology and development in Nepal, and the ongoing socioecological impacts of wildfires. I come to UBC with a professional background in geographic information systems (GIS), wetland delineation and classification, hydrography, and a strong commitment to service, particularly through humanitarian GIS and citizen mapping initiatives. I received my MSc in Geography in 2009, focusing on the relationship between landscape and language among Kaike speakers in Dolpa, Nepal, using a participatory mapping approach to illustrate gendered and children’s worldviews.  Other research projects include: the role of street theater in social change in Nepal; the socio-historical co-evolution of the supernatural and religion in southern Italy; the efficacy of a women’s empowerment program for an international NGO in Nepal; and the association between food and family relationships across three generations of one Italian-American family.

Research Key Words: Language, mobility, identity, borders, space and place, urban anthropology, mapping, GIS, wildfires, socioecological resilience, disaster, climate change, infrastructures, technologies

Research Summary:

I am currently involved in four ongoing research projects.

Language Mapping
As part of a collaborative team represented by university and community researchers from UBC, Dartmouth, NYC, and the Endangered Language Alliance, we are exploring the complexities of mapping urban linguistic diversity in NYC and the impact of COVID-19 on marginalized language communities. Please see the Languages of New York City interactive map of linguistic diversity.

Wildfire Ethnography
Using the 2020 Cameron Peak Fire in Colorado as a focal point, this research aims to unsettle the chronologies of disaster to understand periods of disruption and loss in the context of the socioecological processes that both precede and follow wildfires and continue to impact both people and the environment long after the fire has been extinguished.

Civic Technologies in Nepal
I am researching civic technologies in Nepal in relation to development and other forms of technological infrastructure. The pandemic has also opened up additional research paths in this context. During the height of Nepal's pandemic experience with the Delta variant, multiple volunteer-led initiatives emerged using technology to connect patients with critical oxygen supply, for example, illustrating the development and use of civil technologies in real time to address gaps in the government response.

Ecologies of Harm: Mapping Contexts of Vulnerability in the Time of COVID-19
Along with Principal Investigator Dr. Leslie Robertson and colleague Stephen Chignell, we have created a collaborative spatial archive to document locally defined conditions of vulnerability in order to generate opportunities for knowledge-sharing, dialogues, and solutions-based engagements. Read more about the project, view the spatial archive, and find out how to contribute at Ecologies of Harm.

Concurrent research interests include climate change and disaster vulnerability, language endangerment and maintenance, social-ecological resilience, mountain geographies, and anthropological, ecological, and humanitarian applications of GIS.

2021. Craig, Sienna, Nawang Gurung, Ross Perlin, Daniel Kaufman, Maya Daurio, Mark Turin. “Global Pandemic, Translocal Medicine: The COVID-19 Diaries of a Tibetan Physician in New York City.” Asian Medicine 16: 55-88.

2021. Craig, Sienna R., Nawang Tsering Gurung, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufmann, and Mark Turin. “Negotiating Invisibility at the Epicenter: Himalayan New Yorkers Confront Covid-19.” Items. June 10.

2021. Perlin, Ross, Nawang Gurung, Sienna Craig, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufman, and Mark Turin. “Who Will Care for the Care Worker? The COVID-19 Diaries of a Sherpa Nurse in New York City.” Issues Journal 4 (1).

2021. Craig, Sienna, Maya Daurio, Daniel Kaufman, Ross Perlin, and Mark Turin. “The Unequal Effects of COVID-19 on Multilingual Immigrant Communities.” The Globe and Mail, March 24.

2020. Gurung, Nawang, Ross Perlin, Mark Turin, Sienna R. Craig, Maya Daurio, and Daniel Kaufman. “Himalayan New Yorkers Tell Stories of COVID-19.” The Nepali Times, June 6..

2020. Daurio, Maya, Sienna R. Craig, Daniel Kaufman, Ross Perlin, and Mark Turin. “Subversive Maps: How Digital Language Mapping Can Support Biocultural Diversity—and Help Track a Pandemic.” Langscape Magazine Vol. 9, Summer/Winter 2020, "The Other Extinction Rebellion: Countering the Loss of Biocultural Diversity.".

2020. Maya Daurio and Mark Turin. “‘Langscapes’ and Language Borders: Linguistic Boundary-Making in Northern South Asia.” Eurasia Border Review 10 (1), 21-42.

2020. Maya Daurio. “Review of Trans-Himalayan Traders Transformed: Return to Tarang.” Himalaya 39 (2).

2019. Maya Daurio. “The Significance of Place in Ethnolinguistic Vitality: Spatial Variations Across the Kaike-Speaking Diaspora Of Nepal.” In The Politics of Language Contact in the Himalaya, edited by Selma K. Sonntag and Mark Turin (Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers), pages 109-136.

2012. Maya Daurio. “The Fairy Language: Language Maintenance and Social-Ecological Resilience Among the Tarali of Tichurong, Nepal.” Himalaya 31 (1 & 2): 7-21.

2007. Maya Daurio. “Review of Beyond the Myth of Eco-Crisis: Local Responses to Pressure on Land in Nepal.” The Organization: A Practicing Manager’s Quarterly, July-September 10 (3).

Vanier Scholarship, 2021
Esri Canada GIS Scholarship (co-recipient with Stephen Chignell), 2021
President's Academic Excellence Initiative PhD Award, UBC, 2021
Public Scholars Award, UBC, 2020
Four Year Doctoral Fellowship, UBC, 2019-2023